Duck Tape Feathers and Beads Necklace

Hello, sweet friends! I figured I’d switch things up a bit and share a fun and simple-yet-trendy jewelry project with you today.

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It’s not often I make a piece of jewelry with a dress in mind, but I happened to find this sweet sundress and was in Hobby Lobby the same day and saw they had Duck brand Duct Tape on clearance. I remembered a recent blog post by Jennifer Priest showing how to make the feathers and thought the color combo would be perfect for a unique jewelry piece to match the sundress. Jennifer shows you quite well how to make them if you’re interested. (click HERE for the details) I will note that just clipping the feathers didn’t leave enough dimension for me, as they don’t really stay ‘feathered’, so I cut away a few pieces here and there.

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It’s a great piece for the summer heat as the feathers truly are feather weight, and the natural stone beads are feel cool on your neck.

Materials used:

  • Cousin Jewelry Basics beads & findings
  • Additional beads by: Nicole, Bead gallery, Jesse James & co, and misc.
  • Duck Tape
  • JLP Products Fashion Burlap Duct Tape

Wondering what to do with the left over Duck Tape? You can find dozens of projects on duckbrand.com

I hope to be back soon to show you a neat new technique I learned at the Scrapbook Expo in Orlando.

Thanks for stopping by today!

-D.Ann

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Na’vi Inspired Choker and Jewelry

I have a surprise for you today… It’s not often I post jewelry, but a friend took me to Cirque de Solie’s Toruk and I whipped up some Na’vi inspired jewelry to wear to the event and I thought you might like to see it:

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I had some burl wood earrings, so I just added feathers. A quick bit of macrame work and a few natural looking beads made a great Na’vi inspired choker. Some time ago I’d made the natural jasper, garnet and agate necklace and I made a pair of natural looking bracelets out of two antique buttons sewn to hairbands.

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The show was amazing as Cirque productions always are. Not as much acrobatics as normal because this was more like a play mixed with some acrobatics, but the special effects were AMAZING. You really believed the stage was flooded with water at one point. The costumes were out of this world!

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It’s going to take me a couple of days of rest to recuperate from the outing, but it was quite enjoyable!

I’m going to put these in Carolyn Dube’s AColorfulJourney.com Let’s Play (Still not hardware craft, but it was crafty play!) HERE

I hope you have a wonderful weekend!

-D.Ann

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Wire wrapped, beaded cuff with Joan Rivers Classics Collection Bee Brooch

This week’s crafting whim is a change of pace from all the cards of late. It’s a wire wrapped, beaded cuff that I did for a friend.

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It is difficult to photograph and I haven’t figured how to get videos to upload, so I uploaded a quick video of it to photobucket. You can see it by clicking HERE. I’m not the best video taker, but it does show the cuff fairly well.

Now a bit of the details…

She had previously brought me two Joan Rivers Classics Collection Bee Brooches that had the clasp broken off and asked if I could fix them. I was able to epoxy new clasps on by adding, of all things, an upholstery tack top to give it stability.

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However, as I wasn’t sure of how they would hold up, I told her if they broke again, I could make her a wire wrapped, beaded cuff similar to the one I recently learned to make for myself:

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She immediately left one of the pins and asked me to make the cuff.

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First thing… to get rid of the clasp! I was surprised at how easily I could cut through the metal. No wonder they broke so easily.

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Next, since the base was to be of different wire than I had worked with previously, I went back to my friend, Mary, of Wire and Wings. She taught me how to make my cuff and she helped me get the hammered wire base for this one ready, using 12 gauge wire. If you’re interested in classes, you can go to her website, HERE. She does a FAB job of teaching and is VERY patient!

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Then it was just a matter of selecting the beads and crystals, stringing them on and wire wrapping them and the brooch to the cuff base with 24 gauge wire. It gets a little bit fiddly at times, but the end result is gorgeous.

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Here are a few more pictures of the finished project:

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I hope she likes her cuff as much as I like mine! Perhaps you’ll be inspired to try making one, too!

Thanks for stopping by!

-D.Ann

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Stamped Kanzashi Flower Pin – the deatials

Good morning! Thanks for coming back today for the details on how to put this together. I was just overcome with fatigue last night and had to stop.

For those of you just joining us today, the original post is here. Here’s the finished product:

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Fun tidbit: Tsumami kanzashi is the traditional Japanese handcraft of folding fabric flower hair ornaments.

As I said yesterday, I made this from some blog candy fabric and ink I received from Hydrangea Hippo a while back. It included some lovely spring muslin fabrics from Ann Butler Designs and some Colorbox Crafter’s Inks from Clearsnap. I was curious to use these inks for the first time… Would they bleed through the material? Would they stain my stamp? Would they come off on the iron? Would they really be permanent? Could I actually stamp my own fabric?

As Mr. Monk used to say, “Here’s what happened:”

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I placed the muslin fabric on a foam stamp pad, inked up my Unity stamp from the March 2014 Kit of the Month (The Reason Someone Smiles) with Colorbox Spiced Plum Crafter’s Ink and stamped the material just like I would a card. Since this stamp is the perfect size for one Kanzashi petal, I stamped 5 (later I found I needed 2 more), which fit perfectly across the ‘fat quarter” of fabric with a little left over. I went ahead and stamped it to give me wiggle room. My edges overlapped a little, but they won’t show on the flower, so that’s ok.

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To make the ink permanent, it has to be heat set (I assume without steam).

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Being skeptical about the new ink, I put paper towels on top and underneath in case the ink were to come off or bleed through… I was happy to see white paper towels after the first pass! So I continued without the paper towels. There was no heavy bleed through of ink, either:

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Yay! So I’m guessing it IS permanent, too. So, now can say I have actually hand stamped my own fabric! Woo-hoo! : )

Now it’s time to gather the materials for the next steps. I’ll try to give you a photo tutorial.

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Using a Clover Round Petal Kanzashi Flower Maker, fold the stamped material in half, right sides out. Place the fold of the material along the fold of the plastic pattern, close the pattern and cut around it.

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The next part is optional, but I like to run Dritz FrayCheck around the edges.

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Since I have two patterns, I usually let one dry a little while I work on the other. I’m too impatient to wait on them to dry completely, tho. : ) The sewing is a cinch! Complete instructions are in the package. The most important thing is to be sure to start on the side that says “START”… otherwise you can’t get it out of the pattern afterward. (Can you guess how I know?!! hahaha!) Thread your needle with any color of thread. I like to use one that matches, but it will barely be seen – if at a -l, so it doesn’t have to match. I also like to use doubled thread for strength. Just push the needle through the hole marked “START” with a “1” beside it, flip it to the side the needle comes out and pull through. Push the needle through hole 2…

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… then flip to the other side and pull through…. Eight stitches. and you’re done. Easy peasy! Open the pattern…

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…and, while holding the material in one hand, pull the thread taught with the other. It will roll itself into a ball:

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Smooth it out into it’s proper shape with your fingers. You may have to fiddle a bit with rolling the back sides and front top edge, but once you get the hang of it, the next petals are easier. You can tell it’s been a while since I did this, as my first petal has an extra little tuck in it that I missed and couldn’t get out later. Good think real life flowers have odd tucks in them, too! : )

Without tying a knot or cutting your thread, repeat the procedure on the next petal and the next until you have the number you want. I had thought I used 5 last time, but I guess I used a heavier material.

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You can tell this would have looked skimpy had I closed it there, so I stamped 2 more blocks to make 2 more petals – 7 petals total. (The instructions say 6, but I like odd numbers.) I figure this one fat quarter of fabric can make 3 more flowers, if I choose to use it that way.

Once you finish your last petal, run your needle and thread back through the first petal or two and pull the bunch into a tight circle before knotting it off.

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Your flower is now taking shape!

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Here’s the back side:

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Just a few finishing touches and you’re done!

To cover the unfinished edge in the center, you will either want to sew a button on, or use a pretty brad. This time, I happened to be using a brad. For the back, you will want a round piece of felt that is just over an inch in diameter. Since I’m making this into a pin, I also used an 1 1/4″ pin back.

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You might be able to skip some of the following steps, as I tend to be over-cautious. However, I have yet to have any of my friends complaining about theirs falling apart yet. (Maybe they’re just too polite.. hahaha!) And, although I only recommend spot washing these, a couple of times I have accidentally left mine on something that got ran through the wash and, amazingly, the pin came out fine!

I use a little E6000 glue to attach the pin back to the felt. Then I sew it down, too.

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Next I put the brad in the center of the flower, then open the tines a little. While holding the brad in place, I use my low temperature hot glue gun and fill the center ‘hole.’

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(I set it down to take the pic. Holding it helps me keep it in place) Note: If your brad is metal – it will get HOT! (voice of experience!) If you are using a metal button, same thing! If your button has large holes, the glue might ooze through them and will be hot! (voice of experience, again!) Be careful!!

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Make a small ring of glue around the center of your flower. You want this big enough to attach the felt with the pin back, but not to ooze out the sides. I also leave enough room for the final step, which is optional.

Figure out where you want the top of your flower to be. This is not overly important as it can be pinned at any angle when done, but I like to have a general ‘top’ selected. Depending on how you like to use your pins, you may also want to think about which way you want the clasp on your pen back to face. Personally, I like to be looking at the top on the back side and have the clasp to my left.  While the glue is still hot, press the felt with the pin back onto the back of the flower.

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An optional finishing touch: sew the felt to the flower. Again, it’s not absolutely necessary, but I haven’t had any fall off yet! : ) Plus, I think I gives a finished look to the piece.

I hope this tutorial was helpful. Feel free to contact me with any questions.

Have a lovely day!

-D.Ann

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Stamped Kanzashi Flower Pin

Welcome to today’s crafting whim… a stamped Kanzashi flower pin.

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Back in February, on the Clearsnap and Ann Butler Designs blog hop, I won some fab blog candy from Hydrangea Hippo. It included some Color Box Crafter’s Ink, ADORNit fabric and Simplicity quilting tools.

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As you know, my world moves much slower than I would like and I just got to tackle my first project with the goodies this week. I was interested to check out the Colorbox crafters ink as it is new to me. I had questions… Will it bleed through the material? Will it stain my stamp? Will it come off on the iron? Will it really be permanent? Can I actually stamp my own fabric?

So I decided to try stamping the cream colored fabric in Spiced Plum, using a Unity stamp from the March 2014 Kit of the Month (The Reason Someone Smiles).

Now, it’s way past my bedtime, and I want to get this entered into Unity Stamp Company’s Friends With Flair challenge, so I will post the details on how it was done in the next day or two. Stay tuned…

Hope to see you again!

-D.Ann

4/11/15: The details and tutorial are now up!

https://dannscraftingwhims.wordpress.com/2015/04/11/stamped-kanzashi-flower-pin-the-deatials/

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I am also entering this in Simon Says Stamp’s Monday Challenge: A is for… Ann Butler Designs fabric and her ink, produced by Clearsnap, which were used to make this flower. You can find the challenge here:

http://www.simonsaysstampblog.com/mondaychallenge/?p=2577

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Wire Wrapped Stone Pendants

Today was a jewelry day. A friend wanted these stones turned into pendants:

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I don’t have a way to drill for a bail, so decided to wire wrap them. I’ve only wire wrapped once before… a piece of  agate for mom:

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There’s a fab step-by-step tutorial here that I followed. I used Beadsmith Craft Wire, 21 gauge, square gold and Darice 24 guage gold wire to wrap. They were a little more difficult as the sides were smooth, but I think they turned out ok…

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The pics are front and back since I made these reversible. (click on the pics to enlarge)

Hope she likes ’em!

Glad you could stop by today!

-D.Ann

Ladder Yarn Crochet Necklaces

I wrapped up a couple of ladder yarn (also known as trellis yarn) crochet necklaces to give to some friends next week.

It’s funny… both of my grandmothers tried to teach me to crochet, but I never could get the tension right and it’d be too tight, then too loose, then…. argh! But a while back my mom bought a lovely ladder yarn necklace at a botanical gardens and I looked on line to see how it was made and gave it a whirl… They’re super easy and don’t require an even tension, so It’s something I can do. These necklaces are light as a feather and hand washable. Most everyone that I have given them to have been well pleased with them.

Here are the ones I just finished:

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These were crocheted for a mother and daughter using Flame ladder yarn. The mother’s measures 24 and the daughter’s is 16 inches. They both have magnetic clasps.

This one is made from Jazzy ladder yarn… you can see it lives up to its name!…

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Didn’t get the cards done yet… perhaps they’ll make another post.

Thanks for stopping by today.

– D.Ann